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Posts Tagged ‘skills for shakespeare’

SkullThat you may not be in dire need due to a lack of helpful language, I have just added this useful page to the Acting Shakespeare Resources:

Acting Shakespeare – Useful Notes on Language

You’ll find a lot of quick information there on pronunciation, punctuation, verse, grammatical usages, etc. This post may also be of interest, on plot vs. language.

Had a laugh too – as a result of my Shakespeare twitterings over on Twitter, while I started typing this, thebardbot (Twitter name for an account that responds to #shakespeare with a quote from the bard) sent me:

O, there has been much throwing about of brains.

This is spoken by Guildenstern about players (Hamlet – Act 2; Sc. 2) and feels wonderfully apt for all the hard work I’ve been doing on the Skills for Shakespeare series and this Useful Notes page!

Now for that other quote – the title for this post:-

I know you are the Muskos’ regiment:
And I shall lose my life for want of language;
If there be here German, or Dane, low Dutch,
Italian, or French, let him speak to me; I’ll
Discover that which shall undo the Florentine.

This is the braggart Parolles in All’s Well that Ends Well (Act 4; Sc. 1) – he is ready to ‘discover’ (reveal) treasonous information, offering a deal while he believes he is being held captive by the enemy, which he isn’t. Yep, those Shakespeare folk love a good trick!

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The Skills for Shakespeare series looks at techniques that help you with acting Shakespeare.

The first in this series is an introduction to iambic pentameter.

Iambic pentameter is the term for a particular type of rhythm: an iamb is a meter which has two beats, the second one stressed, as in the word iamb itself, pronounced ”I AM“. Penta means five, so 5 x iamb = pentameter.

This is explored in simple steps, with multimedia links and clear examples, in:

Discover Fine Acting’s Skills for Shakespeare – Speaking in Iambic Pentameter

Do comment / ask questions! You are welcome to do this here or at the full article.

Enjoy!

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